Wikipedy.com                                                                                           Online encyclopedia

   Home     Add article      About

 INDEX

 

Airport, facts about airports

A large modern airport is a scene of intense activity both by day and by night. At peak periods, huge jet airliners, weighing over 500 tons and carrying nearly 1000 passengers, take off or land every minute or so. Every year a large airport may handle 15 million passengers.

Airport facts - cockpit of a modern airliner

Airport, facts about airports

The cockpit of a modern airliner, showing the maze of instruments and controls

To deal with such vast amounts of traffic, every activity must be carefully coordinated. As soon as an aircraft has landed on the runway, it moves along a taxiway to an area called an apron. Immediately, trucks to carry baggage and buses to carry passengers hurry towards it. Then fuel tankers move in to refill the airliner's fuel tanks. A quick turn-around is always aimed for because the airliner is not earning any money while it is on the ground.

Airport facts - aircraft arriving at a busy airport

Airport, facts about airports

Aircraft arriving at a busy airport may have to 'stack', that is, fly at different levels while waiting their turn to land. When the runway is clear, the aircraft at the bottom of the stack is allowed to land and the rest move down one level

The most important people at the airport are the air-traffic controllers in the control tower, who supervise the landing and take-off of each aircraft. They bring down an aircraft from a height of five or six miles onto a runway about two miles long and 200 feet wide. Most airports have a criss-cross pattern of main runways so that aircraft can always land against the wind, which is much safer.

Airport, facts about airports

In a blind-landing system an aircraft is automatically guided down onto the runway by a mechanical 'autopilot'. A localizer beacon tells the autopilot where the runway center line is; a guide-slope beacon marks the correctly angled approach path; and a marker indicates the distance to the runway threshold

Aircraft contact the control tower as they approach the airport. If the runways are full, the controller tells the aircraft to circle one above the other until the runway is free. This is called stacking. The ground controller uses a variety of instruments to bring the aircraft down safely in all kinds of weather. His main ones are radio and radar. His radar screen indicates the direction, distance and height of the aircraft. He can therefore guide the aircraft in by radio contact. Other electronic devices aid landing. The Instrument Landing System puts aircraft on the right flight path. The Automatic Landing System guides and lands the aircraft automatically.

You can read these articles also:

 
 
 

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

U

V

W

X

Y

Z

 
   
   
 
 
   
 
   
   
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
       

Wikipedy.com @ - Online Encyclopedia